Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Update re Live Electronic Music Performance Design

Last year, I wrote about an idea I had — a way to bring back some elements of classic raves and see those elements survive better. Over the years, rave music has done incredibly well, while rave events have almost been crushed by governments. The difference is, at a concert, the artists are special and the audience is there to see them, while at a classic rave, things were set up for the dancers first and the DJs second.

My design was a hybrid of a concert, a rave, a hippie drum circle, and a video game arcade. A performer plays drums in the center, while audience members can play along in little drum pods scattered in a circle around the performer. All the drums are electronic. They play sounds like a normal drum, but they also trigger video software. Thus the "audience" plays a part in creating the event.





Contrast this with the amazing setup the Glitch Mob uses to perform live:



I love this and hate it too. It's excellent work. It's beautiful. It's badass. It incorporates, updates, and adapts Japanese taiko drums while still remaining respectful of the original source material — a balance which artists often get wrong. But it's still 100% about the artists being special and the audience being there to see them, which to me seems much more like a rock concert than a club or a rave.

Also, at one point in the video, one of the Glitch Mob's shocked that a Hollywood set designer can draw, which is kind of ridiculous, because that's the job. And as a programmer, there are moments which seem silly too, because they wrote custom software, but all it seems to do is function as a bus for controller input. In the age of Overtone and Quil, that's kind of a letdown, especially given the stuff other artists are doing with custom software.

Anyway, back to my own design: in addition to these little 3D sketches. I also wrote a basic version of the software I had in mind. My drumming in this video is terrible, and so is the software, really, but it illustrates the basic idea. Hitting the drums triggers color changes in computer-generated visuals.



I've been outdone in this category as well. This is a promo video for the Critter & Guitari Rhythm Scope, an analog video synthesizer which responds to sound:



The interesting thing about this, to me, is that it's analog rather than digital.

Speaking of which, the performer in my design had a strobe light attached to their drum set. It's the little black box with a grey mesh:



I bought a strobe light and attempted to integrate it with my electronic drum kit using a protocol called DMX. Got absolutely nowhere, although I found some existing solutions in Ruby and Node (using both CoffeeScript and JavaScript).

But I've discovered that a small company in Italy makes a Eurorack solution for this, which links DMX to CV instead of MIDI. (Rolling your mouse over the bottom of the video brings up an audio control, although this rather stupidly assumes you're on a computer, not a phone or a tablet.)



More news as events warrant.